Deborah Kerr – By Yul Brynner, on set.

Deborah Kerr on the set of ‘The King and I’, 1956 (Photo by co-star Yul Brynner)
I am not the author of this image. All rights go to Yul Brynner.
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Lana Turner, in color.

Femme Fatal Lana Turner, known for her role in The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946), The Bad & The Beautiful (1952) and Imitation of Life (1959) is photographed by here by Hungarian photographer Laszlo Willinger.
Willinger invited by studio photographer Eugene Robert Richee to move to the United States. After establishing a studio in Hollywood, California, Willinger became a frequent contributor to magazines and periodicals, providing magazine cover portraits of some of the most popular stars. Willinger was one of the first Hollywood photographers to experiment in the use of color.

I am not the author of this image.

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Lana Turner un-retouched. Photographed by Laszlo Willinger, 1939

Takashi Miike portraits by Denis Rouvre

Takashi Miike (pronounced Meekay) is one of the japanese most prolific filmmaker. He has directed 89 films since the beginning of 1991. His films are known for  Extreme violence,Surrealism and Dark humor.Miike is mainly known for his disturbing romantic horror Audition & Ichi the killer. The latter is based on a Manga comic of the same name. He is also known for his Samurai movie 13 assassins.

Here are some cool portraits of Takashi Miike by french photographer Denis Rouvre! I am not the author of these images.
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This is a generation contribution of Tarun Neo. Thank you Tarun!

Takashi Miike photographed by Denis Rouvre Takashi Miike photographed by Denis Rouvre2

Gestures and laughs on the set of “Cries & Whispers” (1972)

Liv Ullmann, Harriet Andersson, Ingrid Thulin, and Ingmar Bergman and the rest of the crew on the set of Cries and Whispers (1972).
I am not the author of these images. Thank you Tarun Neo.

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Cries & Whispers.Cries_1Cries_2Cries_3Cries_4Cries_5Cries_6Cries_7Cries_8CRIES_Ingrid, Ingmar, Liv, Harriet

Akira Kurosawa painting on set of Dodes’ka-den (1970)

Akira Kurosawa painting on set of Dodes’ka-den (1970). Unknown photographer. Thank you Tarun Neo for your contribution.

Daisaku Kimura, first assistant cameraman on Dodes’ka-den: I thought he would be demanding about getting the colors he wanted, but he said nothing about that. On Dodes’ka-den, what he did was to use color without relying on the film stock itself. He painted every object to be filmed. He didn’t trust the film stock. He painted everything. The sunset in the film was created on a soundstage. He told us to paint it however we liked, so I joined in. But when Kurosawa tells you to paint, it makes you nervous. He was an artist himself, so everyone was nervous. But he said not to worry, to be like kids painting picture books, so we went ahead.


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Akira Kurosawa painting the set of Dodes’ka-den.

Orson Welles on the cover of “TIME”

On May 9th, 1938, Orson Welles appeared on the cover of “Time” magazine. And why, do I hear you wonder was Welles on the cover before he created and released all his film classics?
Because he had co-founded Mercury Theater with actor John Houseman. After four hit plays in six months, Welles made the cover of Time. Welles shocked America with his adaptation of HG Wells‘s The War of the Worlds on Halloween night. “I wish I could convey the atmosphere… the background of this… fantastic scene.” These were the first words of a broadcast which terrified its audience by sounding like a news bulletin, not a play. 

I am not the author of this image. Photo credits go to Paul Dorsey
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May 9, 1938 Orson Welles

How Jack became the Joker

“When producer Michael Uslan was first thinking about how to bring a darker version of Batman to the big screen, back in 1980, he saw a photo of Jack Nicholson from The Shining in the newspaper — and he started drawing on it. Uslan turned Nicholson’s famous “Here’s Johnny!” face into the Clown Prince of Crime. And, just nine years later, the rest was movie history.”
Thank you Rawad Nassif for this lovely contribution. Check out Jack and Antonioni on the set of The Passenger, here
I am not the author of this image, all rights go to the author.
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