Günter Grass, David Bennent & Volker Schlöndorff on the set of The Tin Drum!

Günter Grass (left) with actor David Bennent (centre), who played Oskar Matzerath in the film adaptation by director Volker Schlöndorff (right) of Grass’s novel The Tin Drum. Photograph: United Artists/EPA
I am not the author of this image.
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The many faces of Ivan the Terrible : Original posters.

No introduction needed to Sergei Eisenstein’s “Ivan the Terrible, pt.I ” (1944) & pt.II (1958). Feast your eyes on these posters from all over the world with different artists, some unknown, and several styles highlighting Nikolai Cherkasov‘s terrifying look.

I am not the author of these images. All rights go to the artists.

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Check out the last portrait of Eisenstein with a sugar skull here:

IVAN_1 IVAN_2 IVAN3 IVAN4 IVAN5 Polish Poster IVAN7 IVAN8 IVAN9

Ivan el terrible. Argentinian poster. By Osvaldo Venturi.

Ivan the Terrible. Russian Poster. By M. Dulgach.

Ivan the Terrible. Polish posters. By Franciszek Starowisky

Los Olvidados’ amazing posters !

One of my favorite Luis Bunuel films is “Los Olvidados” (1950), starring Alfonso Meja & Roberto Cobo as juvenile delinquents in a Mexico Citythese slum.  A lot of posters have been made to market the film, here are my favorites.

In a row, the countries where these posters were made are: Germany – Germany – Argentina – Japan.

I am not the author of these images. All rights belong to the authors.

Last Year in Marienbad (1961) : My top 5 posters

Alain Resnais’ masterpiece “Last Year at Marienbad” (1961) is indeed one of many great works he delivered throughout the years. Along with “Hiroshima mon Amour” (1959), it is surely one of the director’s most known work.

Let us check out how the film got presented, through its posters, in France, Germany, Japan and Poland…

This first image is a poster painted by Ercole Brini (1913-1989), born in Rome, whose work ranges from Rear Window to The Bycicle Thief. His work is characterized by strong brush strokes together with a very distinct water-color style.

This Last Year in Marienbad is one of his distinguished works.

German poster: Letztes Jahr in Marienbad. Illustrated by Hans Hillmann 

German poster: Letztes Jahr in Marienbad. Illustrated by Tostmann (no mention of first name)

Japanese poster: Last Year at Marienbad (unknown illustrator)

Polish poster: Last Year at Marienbad. Illustrated by Wiktor Sadowski in 1992. 

NB- I am not the author of these images. All rights go to the artists.

Check out Alain Resnais’ concentration camp documentary, shot in 1955 in Poland, “Night & Fog”, here.

A great tribute to Hanna Schygulla

Here’s a tribute I found by a very interesting artist named Ralf Ueltzhoeffer. Born in 1966, in Mannheim, Germany, he usually uses typography to create portraits of famous faces, thus using the medium as an art in its own right. His artistic research is dedicated to the relationship of visual and written information in cyberspace in the creation of faces and visual blind spots.

Here’s his 2009 portrait of Hanna Schygulla, the famous German actress.

All rights go to Ralph Ueltzhoeffer.

 

A Gabin-Dietrich affair

In 1939, French actor Jean Gabin began a love affair with German actress Marlene Dietrich. They starred in a film together “Martin Roumagnac”aka “The Room Upstairs” (1946, directed by Georges Lacombe) was not a success and their personal relationship soon ended.

© Here are some photos from their affair. Not a lot of information are available about these images, except that the last one was shot in Los Angeles in 1942. All rights go to the author/photographer.

 

“Triumph of the Will” (1934)

© Leni Riefenstahl ‘s “Triumph of the Will” (1934), the infamous propaganda documentary representing Hitler’s rally in Nueremberg, Germany.
Racks were laid so that her cameramen could get traveling shots of the crowd. When rough cuts weren’t up to par, major party leaders and high-ranking public officials reenacted their speeches in a studio for her.Riefenstahl also used a film crew that was extravagant by the standards of the day. Her crew consisted of 172 people who also worked on aerial photography.